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DARING TO HOPE: Discussion Questions & Quotes

Daring To Hope

Katie Davis Majors

Book Club Discussion Questions:

  1. Why do think this book is so popular? Did it make you cry? At what parts?
  2. Has anyone ever traveled to Uganda or close?  Does anyone want to go to the “Pearl of Africa” after reading this book?
  3. “Prisoners of Hope” are explained in ch. 5.  What did you learn about hope? Why do we sometimes resist hope? 
  4. Besides hope, what other themes did you see in this book?  Which one is the most meaningful to you right now? 
  5. “The LORD Will Provide” (p. 26, 192) is another theme. “But God’s promise to Abraham spoke to me. God wasn’t promising me ease. He wasn’t promising that things would go as planned. God wasn’t promising a world without trouble, without heartbreak along the way. He was promising me Himself.”
  6. Katie mentions a few lessons that she learned about life in the Western world vs. Uganda.  What can we learn?
  7. Katie discusses the true meaning of “happy endings.” (pp. 14-15) She shares how her “happy ending thinking” was redefined (p. 39)  Does teaching our children to pursue the American dream go against her idea?
  8. Besides Katie, which person in this book is the most memorable to you and why? (Betty dying p. 124-130)
  9. Many people think that what Katie Davis Majors has done is very brave (p. 135). Do you agree? How has reading this book challenged you to do something that takes courage?  What is one thing that you will do now?
  10. Is there a Scripture verse that was referenced or a quote that spoke to your heart?  Care to share? (i.e., “A faith that trusts Him only when the ending is good is a fickle faith. A faith that trusts Him regardless of the outcome is real.”)
  11. Do you have any criticism of this book- the content, the style? What would you say to someone who says, “Easy for Katie to say, she’s living a blessed life: big family, loving husband, great health, fruitful ministry. Easy for her to talk about meeting God in the hard”?
  12.  To whom would you recommend this book? Why?

Quotations from DARING TO HOPE:

  1. Sometimes the things we would never pick for our lives gives us opportunities to receive God’s provision, to see Him working in ways we otherwise might not…
  2. It is a bit of a mess, this business of love. As more and more people enter our lives, we are left with not choice but to enter theirs as well…This, at first glance, seems so burdensome, so overwhelming, but somehow I have found it not to be any longer. Something about shouldering the burdens of another brings a lightness to our own affliction. We are in it together, and Christ is in it with us.
  3. Then we both look at that leg and see so much more than new skin. We see Jesus. He met us right there on the cold, hard cement floor of my sunroom with our festering wounds and our messy hearts. He took two broken people and showed us the scars on His hands and whispered that it was okay if we had our scars too, because the scars were always meant to draw us into His glory.
  4. In a full life of trying to do great big things for God and see His glory in big ways, He showed me that He is glorified in the small too. He is glorified in each pot of pasta faithfully put on the table for our people. God is glorified each time we look into a stranger’s eyes and acknowledge the person’s humanity. He is glorified when we focus on Him instead of focusing on our lack, and He is glorified when we help our child with her hundredth math problem..Small acts of love become whispers of His glory in the midst of our everydayness.” 
  5. I think that each of us just as lacking as the next, the most powerful thing we can do for another person is not to try to fix his or her pain or make it go away but to acknowledge it. I cannot heal or perform miracles. Even for all my trying, I cannot make sure that someone will receive salvation from Jesus. But I can be a witness. I can look at another’s broken, bleeding mess and say, ‘I see you. I am with you. I will not turn away.’
  6. I miss Katherine’s laugh, loud and infectious. When I see her children smile, I see her, and I still wish the ending had been different.I asked God Why? again and again. What could all this suffering possibly accomplish? Why would He allow us to love people so deeply? A dear friend suggested, “Maybe because He knew you would. Could it be that be God’s answer to us as we walk the hard road? “I knew you would do it. I knew you would love them.” And suddenly the hard road becomes not a burden but a place of great honor, a place of partnership and intimacy with Him.
  7. Then I think that maybe courage is not at all about the absence of fear but about obedience even when we are afraid. Maybe courage is trusting when we don’t know what is next, leaning into the hard knowing that it will be hard, but God will be near.
  8. And I want to be just like that little bird. Hope is a crazy thing, a courageous thing. Faith is a bold, irrational choice. But that little bird—she feels the sun coming, knows with certainty that it will come, even when she can’t yet see it
  9. I am the addict and doubt is my drug, this ugly lack of trust, the place I turn when I am weak. It is my lifelong Jacob wrestle, my unwillingness to lay a dear one on the altar and trust that the Lord will provide. 
  10. Our hope in Him is not determined by our circumstances but by His character, always faithful to us.

May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him,

so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Romans 15:13

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Winter’s Past. Go On Into Spring.

We have the power either of withstanding the spring, and sinking back into the cosmic winter, or of going on into those ‘high mid-summer pomps’ in which our Leader, the Son of Man, already dwells, and to which He is calling us.

C.S. Lewis

The last JoyPrO was about pain that’s real and pressing and all creation groaning and our way-long delayed spring.

That was last week.

Winter Is Past

But it’s 78° today. Windows open, shorts on and the daffodils are smiling at the doves.

Spring came this way slowly. But, as C.S.  Lewis wrote, the great thing is that the corner has been turnedThe winter is past, the snow is over and done. The flowers appear on the earth, the time of singing has come, The corner has been turned- at least, outside.

And who in his right mind wouldn’t prefer spring over winter?

Don’t Sympathize (With Yourself)

But some don’t. Sometimes I don’t. Sometimes I prefer to wait in the cold and withstand the spring.

Don’t get me wrong, My heart thrilled in the breeze in the season’s first big bike ride today.  I mean the inner spring. The one Christ said wells up to eternal life. I mean, if I’m not careful, my soul lingers in woe-is-me winter. I’ve noticed that when my soul winters linger it’s because I’m stuck sympathizing with myself. 

Now sympathy for others is good and right. It’s beautiful. We are called to weep with those who weep (Romans 12:15b) and to have sympathy, brotherly love, a tender heart, and a humble mind (1 Peter 3:8).

But our hearts are supposed to feel tender toward others, to be directed outside of ourselves.

I know- too well- that melancholy and self-pity are a slippery, wintry mix for my soul. They tend toward dark nights. When I sympathize with myself, I choose winter over spring. I choose not to turn the corner and I deprive my Help, my God, of glory.

But my inner self loves spring. Which is why I’m on a sophron quest, a self-control, sound-mind mission to not let my emotions rule me. It’s why I’m learning to distract my wintry thoughts by thinking on excellent and lovely things. To get a grip and push the brakes.

Get a Grip. (Talk to Yourself.)

It is a work. And a process- a Spirit-guided process.

But taking myself in hand is the only way I know to get my soul to spring. Dr. Martyn Lloyd-Jones wrote a book called Spiritual Depression.

Here he  explains why we must get a grip.

This other man within us has got to be handled. Do not listen to him; turn on him; speak to him; condemn him; upbraid him; exhort him; encourage him; remind him of what you know, instead of listening placidly to him and allowing him to drag you down and depress you…

We must talk to ourselves, instead of allowing “ourselves” to talk to us! Have you not realized that most of your unhappiness in life is due to the fact that you are listening to yourself instead of talking to yourself? You must say to your soul, preach to yourself, questions yourself “Why are you so downcast?” (Spiritual Depression, p. 20)

Lloyd-Jones is only echoing the Psalmist’s 3,000 year-old cure for the downcast soul that can’t – or won’t- turn the corner from winter into spring.

Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are so in turmoil within me?

Hope in God; for I shall again praise him, my salvation and my God. 

Let’s take ourselves in hand and leave winter behind.  Hope in God, O my soul. Don’t withstand the spring.

We do have that choice. The flowers don’t. The crocus can’t choose if it will come out in spring or not.

But we can.

Go On Into Spring

We can choose.  

There is, of course, this difference, that in the natural spring the crocus cannot choose whether it will respond or not. We can. We have the power either of withstanding the spring, and sinking back into the cosmic winter, or of going on into those ‘high mid-summer pomps’ in which our Leader, the Son of Man, already dwells, and to which He is calling us. It remains with us to follow or not, to die in this winter, or to go on into that spring and that summer. (C.S. Lewis, “The Grand Miracle,” God in the Dock)

There is a season for everythinga time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance. And God knows it’s not for me to determine the times and seasons he’s appointed. 

But spring has sprung and it is mine to choose if I will get on with it. If I will hope-in-God obey and rise and follow Jesus.

What will you choose?

My beloved speaks and says to me:
“Arise, my love, my beautiful one,
    and come away,
 for behold, the winter is past;
    the rain is over and gone.
 The flowers appear on the earth,
    the time of singing has come,
and the voice of the turtledove
    is heard in our land.

Song of Solomon 2:10-12

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Hannah’s Hope

Her smooth cello drew me. Then, nine months ago we crossed paths again and I made a new friend. Actually, I found a new friend. Or she found me. In any case, our meeting wasn’t chance.

Because, like C.S. Lewis explained, A secret master of ceremonies has been at work. Christ, who said to the disciples, “Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you,” can truly say to…Christian friends, “Ye have not chosen one another but I have chosen you for one another.” The friendship is not a reward for our discriminating and good taste in finding one another out. It is the instrument by which God reveals to each of us the beauties of others” (“The Four Loves”).

Truly.

Hannah was just finishing  her last chemo treatment when we met. But hat or no hat, short hair or no, Hannah is beautiful. Hannah exudes living hope; she laughs at the days to come.  Hannah lives her motto loud: Love Jesus. Love people. Share Jesus with people. By living this way, she strengthens my hope in God. 

Months ago, I invited her to share her story here. This week she took me up.  It is with pleasure that I share Hannah with you. 

Hi. I’m Hannah.

In the past 14 months God has led me and walked with me through stage 2 Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. By His grace I am currently cancer free. I recently participated in the Leukemia- Lymphoma Society (LLS) Light the Night walk. LLS provides support to cancer patients and survivors and supports research to find more effective treatments for blood cancers. I was looking forward to a night of camaraderie and sharing of stories, a night of savoring and rejoicing in life.

And we  did “light up the night with hope.” We raised money and awareness for blood cancer research and patients. The survivors and MC at the event spoke of the support of family and friends through hard times, shared fond memories of those who died of cancer, and we all celebrated the blessing of being survivors.

Yet I left with deep sadness in my soul. Where was the real hope? The solid hope? Not the fluffy, humanistic stuff, but the kind to base your life on, the hope that gives strength for today and bright hope for tomorrow. Where was that hope?

Some Trust In…

“Some trust in chariots [chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, science], some trust in horses [family, friends, statistics, positive thoughts] but we trust in the name of the Lord our God!” –Psalm 20:7

At the event, one of the women spoke of how positive thoughts, human relationships/support, and advances in science got her through treatment. I listened and thought sadly,  “Really? That’s all she’s got?” This is “hope”?  If it is, hope ends when life ends.

Positive thoughts are proven to help cancer patients handle treatment and life better, but no one  on her deathbed can save her  life by positive thinking. Human relationships have great power to affect lives, but all of us will die, and most of us won’t be remembered for long after our death (maybe a lifetime or two…).

Science provides many amazing ways to combat diseases and increase life expectancies, but no science could have predicted that I would be diagnosed with cancer at the age of 24. And this diagnosis after I’d lost 50 pounds and had really begun to live a “healthy” lifestyle. In fact, I’d run a PR in a 10k the week before my chemo treatments started. Beyond that, none of us can control whether or not the cancer returns. I know death is only breath away.

When the rubber meets the road, these sources of “hope” are just man-made smoke screens covering an abyss of hopelessness – a way for people to cope but not even come close to a permanent solution that addresses all anxieties and possibilities of an uncertain and unknown future.

But what we need, cancer or cancer free, is not hype and not “just to cope,” what we need is to hope.

Not hype, not “just cope”- hope.

“Never be afraid to trust an unknown future to a known God.” -Corrie ten Boom

I’m not saying positive thoughts, human relationships, and science are bad. They are helpful, but they are all much too small and frail to be the basis of real hope.

So what is hope?  True hope is no wishy-washy thing. It does not look to the future with wishful thinking and “positive thoughts.” Oh, it is so much more!

God promises that those of us who have trusted in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior have an imperishable and unfading inheritance, a 100% guarantee of hope in the future no matter what the present holds. Though we face various and difficult trials, we have this hope (1 Peter 1:3-9).

“We do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory…For we know that if the tent that if our earthly home is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.” -2 Corinthians 4:16-5:1

Though this earthly body be destroyed, I have something better and lasting – a building made by God, perfect and eternal, apart from the presence of sin and death, in the very near presence of God…and that is the best part – to get to behold God’s glory forever.

Light The Night, All The Day

I did not survive my cancer, nor do I live cancer free, with an insecure, surface level “hope.” I thrive through cancer and can live free from anxiety. I live with a living hope and seeking to fix my eyes on Jesus, my glorious Savior. Now that is the walk I live each day, by God’s grace, with an excited, joy-filled and hopeful heart. It’s a walk full of camaraderie, sharing stories, rejoicing in and savoring God and the many gifts He has given.

Hannah with her brother and sister

It’s a daily “Light the Night” walk, lighting up the dark world with God’s light and daily proclaiming the greatness of my God and Savior who has called me out of spiritual darkness into His marvelous light.

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession,

that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.

1 Peter 2:9

*Abigail again: I mentioned earlier Hannah plays a mean cello.  This version of Abide With Me features a deep, sweet cello like hers. But it’s more the lyrics than the strings that lead me to thank God for Hannah’s fearless, living hope when I hear these words:

I fear no foe with you at hand to bless, 
though ills have weight, and tears their bitterness. 
Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, your victory? 
I triumph still, if you abide with me. 

Henry Francis Lyte

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4 Words You Don’t Want Stuck In Your Head (And 1 You Do)

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Both boys started at a brand new school this week. New teachers, new classmates, new lunch menus. They love it- especially lunch. We love it and are glad they love lunch. Our thumbs are up for different reasons, but three days in, the new school seems like a great fit.

And I’d be lying if I said, If only we had moved them here sooner hadn’t crossed my mind. If only we had enrolled them before the 7th grade and 4th, maybe they’d have missed some of those pitfalls.

I’d be lying if I denied If only’s criss-cross my mind.

If Only I Had…

We all think them. Sometimes it’s after a happy discovery. As in, If only I had known how much they’d love this broccoli-brownie recipe. They would have eaten cruciferous long before now- or like mine, If only they had gone to this school sooner. 

More often though, the If only I had’s that get stuck in our heads come when bad things happen. As in, If only we had left a minute earlier, there’d have been no accident. Or, If only I had called the doctor at the first pang, I’d have missed all this mess. 

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If only’s are some of the sneakiest is Satan’s vast arsenal. They are joy-taking, grumpy-making words. If we let them rest in our heads, they’ll paralyze our spiritual lives.

If-only-I-would-have’s drive out living hope with dead regret. 

Lethal Meditation

You cannot keep birds from flying over your head, Luther said, but you can keep them from building a nest in your hair. 

But the enemy would love us to be stuck in that rut with a nest of If only’s stuck on our heads. He’d love our If only’s to stink up the present and suck up our life-giving hope.

When we dwell on how life would have been better if we had only known this or done that, we let those dirty birds nest in our hair. Our if-only-I-had’s are a form of meditation- lethal, life-stealing type of meditation.

If only I had’s misplace our focus from the faithfulness and love of our all-wise God to how things would have gone, if I were god. If only I had’s keep us stuck on what cannot be undone. If only I knew’s tell us that we can only find purpose and joy if we know why- one of Satan’s most deadly lies.

Would You Stop The Wheels Of Providence?

If only’s steal joy from ourselves and glory from God. And the chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy him forever. Joy and meaning come when we live out into this reason we were created, and glorify God (Isaiah 43:7). And we reflect His glory when we act, think, feel and live in ways that call attention to the goodness and greatness of God.

But settling in If-Only-Land does not call attention to the goodness and greatness of God. Instead, settling there is second guessing the goodness of the God who guides us with his counsel and leads us for his name’s sake. The God whose ways are inscrutable ways. Providential, interconnected ways.

When a child looks at a clock, it looks first at one wheel, and then at another wheel; he does not look at them all together or the dependence that one has upon another; but the workman has his eyes on them all together and sees the dependence of all, one upon another; so it is in God’s providence…So when God has ordered a thing for the present to be thus and thus, how do you know how many things depend upon this thing? God may have some work to do twenty years hence that depends on this passage of providence that falls out this day or this week.  Jeremiah Burroughs, Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment

When I allow If-only-I-had’s to nest on my head, I’m a child fixated on stopping one gear, not seeing how stopping this gear stops all the other connected gears. I don’t see that God may have a thousand good things that he has to bring about, and those thousand good things may depend on this one thing that I’m wishing had never been.

So, no: dwelling on if-only* is never good.

Learning from Scripture’s If Only We Had’s 

The Israelites lived in If-only Land. They may as well have coined the phrase. “The rabble with them began to crave other food, and again the Israelites started wailing and said, ‘If only we had meat to eat!’ (Num. 11:4). “If only we had died by the Lord’s hand in Egypt! There we sat around pots of meat and ate all the food we wanted” (Ex. 16:3).

They let those birds nest. When Moses and Aaron warned them to leave If-Only Land, they refused to move on. So for forty years they remained stuck in that wilderness land.

Contrast that with King David’s “If-Only-I-Had.” His came after his rebel son Absalom died. At first glance his words sound a lot like the desperate rabble’s: “The king was shaken. He went up to the room over the gateway and wept. As he went, he said: “O my son Absalom! If only I had died instead of you—O Absalom, my son, my son!” (2 Samuel 18:33)

But that’s where the comparison ends. When Joab saw the king camping in dangerous If-Only Land, he warned him. “Now therefore arise, go out and speak kindly to your servants…So the king arose and took his seat in the gate,” (2 Samuel 19:7, 8).

Scripture’s If-only-I-had’s betray impatience with or mistrust in God. Dwelling on those four words reveal hearts that refuse to go at God’s pace to his place or hearts that would second guess the discipline of a loving Father.

Neither response reflects His grace and glory to a watching world.

The God of Hope

Eight years ago this month, my niece Hope was born. By that time, she was already home with Jesus. The loss of Hope was great. Scars remain and grief comes in waves and life is never the same.

But.

But Danielle and Drew know. They know there will come a joyful reunion one day. They know that the LORD will swallow up death forever and wipe away tears from all faces (Isaiah 25:8). They know that what is mortal will be swallowed up by life (2 Cor. 5:4).

And they know- really know- intimately and in real life and real time- know the God of hope (Romans 15:13). He fills them with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit they abound in hope (Romans 15:14). They abound in hope because they know the God of hope. The God of Hope.

But there is something big they don’t know.

If Only I Knew Why

I have a handful of friends who have endured unthinkable, tragic loss.  If-only-I-knew-why has danced through every one of their heads. And without exception, each one has relinquished her demand to know and understand why.

Vaneetha Rendall Risner isn’t a personal friend, but she has also endured,”unspeakable, unexpected, and preventable,” loss. Vaneetha says, If-only-I-knew-why had her bound.

While I thought that freedom would be found in answers, true freedom was actually found in surrender. I didn’t need to figure it out. It didn’t need to make sense to me. I didn’t need to understand the details. I just needed to trust God. Trust him because he is infinitely wiser, more loving, and more purposeful than I am.

[I]f we could see what God sees, we would be stunned. There is much more taking place in the heavenly realms than we can fathom.

God is infinitely more purposeful than any of us. And he always has a reason. He’s probably got many, because He alone knows all the facts. John Piper says, “God is always doing 10,000 things in your life, and you may be aware of three of them.” Or none.

By faith, we believe there are reasons. Good reasons. Reasons for delays in our plans and  for huge, unspeakable losses.

Even if we can’t name a single one.

If You Knew All The Facts…You’d Set Your Mind On Hope

Someone once said, God’s will is what you’d desire if you knew all the facts. I like that. It makes me see that most of my If only I had’s come when I don’t trust God knows all the facts. That’s when I end up in If-only Land with a nest on my head. 

So while the boy’s education to date isn’t exactly how I would have planned, I won’t look back. I know God guided us here this year. Not last year- there were too many gears, too many necessary and good connections. He brought us here this year, with His own hand.

Let me close with a little more about Hope.

In the the days and weeks and months after Hope’s birth, my sister and her husband did wonder why. We allwondered why. No test or doctor could explain why they couldn’t get to know Hope this side of heaven.

But Danielle and Drew did not let If-only’s trump hope in their heads. They traded 4 words for 1. They set their hope fully on grace.

And, boy, did that make their God look grand.

Therefore, preparing your minds for action, and being sober-minded, set your hope fully on the grace that will be brought to you at the revelation of Jesus Christ.

1 Peter 1:13

*If only’s in this post refer to morally-neutral choices we wish we had made in retrospect. They do not refer to the Spirit-given good conviction that we have sinned and need to repent. The language of repentance is not generally, If only I had, but Against you only have I sinned. But maybe your If only I had needs to be forgiven. More on that, here.